Grievance Procedures

Every Employee Handbook should include a defined grievance procedure, which outlines the steps an employee must take when he/she has a problem, from potential violence in the workplace, to harassment, or even a common complaint.

The very first step should be to encourage the employee to talk to the person they feel is causing the problem. 90% of problems go away after this, without the necessity of management involvement.

The next steps should be hierarchical – if you’re uncomfortable going to that person, or unhappy with the outcome, go to your supervisor, and so on.

Employee E-Mail Policy

The number of harassment cases involving the e-mails of employees is on the rise. Make sure you have an air-tight, written policy stating that use of company e-mail and internet access is strictly limited to business use only.

Workplace Discrimination on the Rise

It’s official – and somewhat surprising:

Discrimination complaints to the EEOC are on the rise – especially race, sex and retaliation.

What’s disheartening about this is that all of these complaints are preventable – through strong handbook policies, management training, and good investigation techniques.

It’s the 21st Century – and it’s time to manage properly!

What Employees Want

We’ve been saying it for years – a good boss is not a buddy nor a dictator. He/she is somewhere in between.

Employees look for a professional relationship and value that so much in their manager that it’s the primary reason why an employee will stay or leave a company.

Romantic Behavior in the Workplace

Happy Valentine’s Day Eve!

Yet another article on the pitfalls of dating in the workplace – for both employers and employees. What really struck me is the finding that 84% of employees say their employer either doesn’t have a policy regarding dating in the office (or that they don’t know of such a policy).

Shop Your 401(k) Now!

The trend is finally happening – if you don’t compare your 401(k) plan, not only are YOU losing money, but your employees are losing thousands of dollars through hidden fees.

And now is the time – if you don’t have a defined contribution plan – to establish one for your business. High reward, a valued benefit, and low cost to your business.