Quarterly Newsletter and a Sage Cartoonist

I hope you’ll checkout our HR & Management Newsletter by clicking here.

Also, I note with interest David Horsey’s editorial cartoon from July 21.  Mr. Horsey is a talented cartoonist who’s published through the Hearst Newspaper chain.  (You can see all his stuff here).  After I’ve been writing and speaking so much on this topic – that businesses are finding ways of doing more with fewer employers – a client saw this in the San Francisco Chronicle and gave it to me:

David Horsey – Hearst Newspapers

Ten Truths for the Boss

Anyone who’s read this blog over the years, or who knows me personally, is aware that one of my heroes is Michael Josephson.  Mr. Josephson has commented for years on the relationships between ethics and successful, sustainable business models.  One of his greatest radio commentaries discusses “10 Truths for the Boss”, which I’ve put here:

Why is it that most employees think their bosses are at least a little out of touch? Probably because they are. Even those who worked their way to the top lose some credibility and effectiveness because they don’t recognize what I call Ten Truths for the Boss:

  1. The more certain you are that “it can’t happen here,” the more likely it is that it will. Be careful about overconfidence and complacency.
  2. There are lots of things you don’t know, and lots of people who hope you don’t find out. Hardly anybody tells you the whole truth anymore. Information is filtered through the fears and career aspirations of subordinates, and many employees believe you will “kill the messenger” if they deliver bad news so they tell you what they think you want to hear.
  3. To those who want to please you, your whisper is a yell and your comments are commands. Be careful, people may do foolish things to please you.
  4. What you allow, you encourage.
  5. There’s never just one bad employee; there’s the employee and the manager who keeps him.
  6. At least someone who works for you is “gaming” the system so they appear to reach their business objectives with smoke and mirrors rather than real achievement.
  7. According to the law of big numbers, if you have lots of employees, you probably have a few crooks and psychopaths working for you.
  8. Few people think as highly of your ethics as you do.
  9. No matter how many good things you do, you will be judged by your last worst act.
  10. No matter what your job description says, what matters most is how you manage relationships and people.

The Josephson Institute of Ethics website is here.

To follow Mr. Josephson on Facebook, click here.

To follow Mr. Josephson on Twitter, click here.