Social Media and the Workplace

I will be writing extensively in the upcoming weeks about Social Media and the Workplace.  Actually, not so much about social media (there are experts in that area all over the place), but the impact it has on employers and businesses.

So let’s start off with an excellent article written by Maria Greco Danaher of Ogletree Deakins on the potential liability employers have when an employee uses social media.  Here’s an important excerpt:

“…an employee who uses electronic media, including e-mail, blogs, or social networking sites, to make comments about a product made by his or her employer, and who fails to disclose his or her relationship with that manufacturer may create legal liability under the FTC guidelines.  Further, should a consumers rely on a particular comment in that posting to his or her detriment, any ensuing damage could be attributed to the manufacturer/company.”

It’s pretty apparent that social media has a place in the workplace.  Most experts (including me) agree that it’s not practical to ban social media in the workplace.  So what do you do?

More to come…

Managing Social Media in the Workplace

The impact of social media in the workplace is growing.  Time is being wasted, employees are ‘friending’ each other and liability for these issues is a litigation attorney’s dream come true.

RSJ/Swenson has prepared a special report on Managing Social Media in the Workplace, based on Eric Swenson’s recent presentation at the CalCPA Employment Practices Conference.  You can download the report here.

And bosses & managers: Don’t “friend” your employees!

Businesses Taking Action Against E-mails, Linkedin, Facebook

In its 6th annual survey, the security firm Proofpoint reveals some new information regarding social media and e-mails by employees – and it’s almost always resulting in bad news for the employees:

  • 43 percent of US companies surveyed have investigated an email-based leak of confidential or proprietary information in the past 12 months. Nearly a third of them, 31 percent, terminated an employee for violating email policies in the same period (up from 26percent in 2008).
  • US companies are also experiencing more exposure incidents involving sites like Facebook and LinkedIn as compared to 2008 (17 percent versus 12 percent). US companies are taking a much more forceful approach with offending employees — eight percent reported terminating an employee for such a violation as compared to only four percent in 2008.
  • Even short message services like SMS texts and Twitter pose a risk. 13 percent of US companies investigated an exposure event involving mobile or Web-based short message services in the past 12 months.

Read the entire survey here.